Reading Catch-Up

Time for some drive-by book reviews to get you all caught up on my reading since the last one.

The Oracle of Stamboul by Michael David Lukas: It has been awhile since I read this one but I remember liking it. I especially enjoyed the setting; the touch of magic surrounding all the characters and the setting of the romantic Istanbul does a lot to save a sort of convoluted plot.

Maud’s Line by Margaret Verble: [This is excerpted from my Goodreads review and I still agree with it all] Ugh. So, this book and me did not get on. First of all, I know I am coming from a place of white privilege and do not have the same fear of authorities that minorities, particularly Native Americans in 1920s Oklahoma, rightfully have but ugh, Maud needed to trust someone, ANYONE. I found it extremely annoying. If she would have just been honest with a lot of people, she would have been better off. The story is not boring and moves along at a good clip. In fact, it is packed full of action. The author’s similes are a bit much at times; so much so they could bring me out of the story as they were quite jarring but I think that must be the cadence of the language of the area she’s bringing in. Not having visited Oklahoma, it was an area and a culture I was very unfamiliar with. So, I think that was also a sense of my discomfort with the story and its characters. It was very foreign to me, the distrust of authority, the scheming on Maud’s part and then her ability to know what she should do and not doing it anyway, the rather dreary setting and the way the very landscape seems to be driving people crazy. Maud and I agreed on one thing; she needed a change of scene. She was not a comfortable character but rather infuriating. And when it’s her story, it’s hard to get past that.

Ink and Bone (The Great Library #1) and and Paper and Fire (The Great Library #2) by Rachel Caine: This series gets better with each book. I enjoy every character and it’s been awhile since I could say that about a book (or books). The idea for the series is also delightful and the world building is spot on. I do have difficulty when the big bad represents something I generally adore (libraries, books, knowledge) but I like that the whole idea of the series is exploring what happens when the desire to protect such things comes at too high a cost, with too much control over the very thing you’re trying to protect that you subvert its ideals.

Ordinary Grace by William Kent Krueger: A good mystery made more compelling by the coming of age story at the center of it. The brothers Frank and Jake make for excellent guides through a turbulent summer in small town Minnesota.

We Have No Idea: A Guide to the Unknown Universe by Jorge Cham and Daniel Whiteson: Really enjoyed this read; made difficult physics questions easy and fun to understand. Not that I still always understood but I definitely followed better than I did in my high school physics class all those years ago. I enjoyed the partnership between the text and the drawings as well as the type of humor. I’d recommend for someone like me who is curious but not always very good at following high concept science but also for someone a lot younger who hasn’t encountered a physics class yet. I think this would make a great companion for someone taking a class right now too.

Lab Girl by Hope Jahren: Second time the charm! Happy I got this back from the library fairly soon after I had to return it and go back on the waiting list (the first time I got it out, I didn’t have time to finish it!). I really enjoyed this memoir. The science interspersed with Jahren’s stories makes for a very interesting and compelling read. While it doesn’t sound glamorous in any way, it does make you want to be a scientist. Or at the very least go plant something after you’re finished reading it.

Letters to Zell by Camille Griep: As always, I enjoy a good fairy tale retelling. This one was a lot of fun to read. The premise was great to begin with and I love a good book of letters but I think this book surprised me a bit too. I think a lot about what happened after the “happy ever after” (it’s a hobby) and this is one of the more compelling and interesting takes on it. It’s a bit of Shrek meets chick lit in many ways which works better than you’d think.

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